neurosciencenews:

Scientists Discover Brain’s Anti Distraction System
Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors’ perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.
This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.
Read the full article Scientists Discover Brain’s Anti Distraction System at NeuroscienceNews.com.
The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full open access)
Research: “Suppression of Salient Objects Prevents Distraction in Visual Search” by John M. Gaspar and John J. McDonald in Journal of Neuroscience. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4161-13.2014 (http://jn.sfn.org/press/April-16-2014-Issue/zns01614005658.pdf)
Image: Ashley Livingstone, an SFU first year master’s student, models a cap that is fitted with 128 electrodes. They are hooked up to monitor the wearer’s brain activity. Credit Simon Fraser University.

neurosciencenews:

Scientists Discover Brain’s Anti Distraction System

Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors’ perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.

This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.

Read the full article Scientists Discover Brain’s Anti Distraction System at NeuroscienceNews.com.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full open access)

Research: “Suppression of Salient Objects Prevents Distraction in Visual Search” by John M. Gaspar and John J. McDonald in Journal of Neuroscience. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4161-13.2014 (http://jn.sfn.org/press/April-16-2014-Issue/zns01614005658.pdf)

Image: Ashley Livingstone, an SFU first year master’s student, models a cap that is fitted with 128 electrodes. They are hooked up to monitor the wearer’s brain activity. Credit Simon Fraser University.

How Washing Machines Work
In ancient Rome, public laundry service involved large dudes stomping on wet clothes to get the dirt out. By medieval times, launderers used handheld bats or agitators (called, depending on where they were, beetles or battledores and possers, dollies, dashers, ponches, or punches, respectively) to beat the grime out. Purely mechanical machines came along in 1782, and electric machines in 1908. 
A  recent study out of the University of Montreal suggested that advances in household technology during the 20th century — including automated, electric washing machines — were partially responsible for a decrease in time spent on household chores from 58 hours per week circa 1900 to 18 hours per week circa 1975. (And a jump in the number of married women in the workforce from 5% to 51% during the same approximate period of time.) 
Curious about the history and inner workings of these labor-saving machines? Enjoy receiving information aurally? Here, have a podcast episode: How Washing Machines Work [mp3].

How Washing Machines Work

In ancient Rome, public laundry service involved large dudes stomping on wet clothes to get the dirt out. By medieval times, launderers used handheld bats or agitators (called, depending on where they were, beetles or battledores and possers, dollies, dashers, ponches, or punches, respectively) to beat the grime out. Purely mechanical machines came along in 1782, and electric machines in 1908.

A recent study out of the University of Montreal suggested that advances in household technology during the 20th century — including automated, electric washing machines — were partially responsible for a decrease in time spent on household chores from 58 hours per week circa 1900 to 18 hours per week circa 1975. (And a jump in the number of married women in the workforce from 5% to 51% during the same approximate period of time.)

Curious about the history and inner workings of these labor-saving machines? Enjoy receiving information aurally? Here, have a podcast episode: How Washing Machines Work [mp3].

stufftoblowyourmind:

Retrofuturist Flashback: Electric Spaceship, 1775

Here we see a “traveler from the planet Mercury arriving on Earth in his wonderful new electric flying machine.  It’s a 1775 illustration from “The Philosopher Without Pretension or the Rare Man” by French author and polymath Louis Guillaume de la Folie.

READ & SEE MORE: http://is.gd/dL9h1a

stufftoblowyourmind:

Retrofuturist Flashback: Electric Spaceship, 1775

Here we see a “traveler from the planet Mercury arriving on Earth in his wonderful new electric flying machine.  It’s a 1775 illustration from “The Philosopher Without Pretension or the Rare Man” by French author and polymath Louis Guillaume de la Folie.

READ & SEE MORE: http://is.gd/dL9h1a

oakapples:

The Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array (AMILA) at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory near Cambridge.

(via astronemma)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Arecibo Observatory Detects Mysterious, Energetic Radio Burst
A brief, blazing burst of radio waves detected by the Arecibo Observatory could herald a turning of the tide for a peculiar class of cosmic signals. Until recently, the signals had only ever been detected by a telescope in Australia, a pattern that fueled doubts about their origin.
Fewer than a dozen of these bursts, lasting for only a few thousandths of a second, have ever been reported. Called “fast radio bursts,” the signals are cosmic enigmas that appear to come from the very, very distant universe. But since the first burst discovery in 2007, scientists have not only wondered what kind of cosmic object could produce such a tremendously bright, short-lived radio pulse – but have disagreed about whether the bursts are even celestial.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Arecibo Observatory Detects Mysterious, Energetic Radio Burst

A brief, blazing burst of radio waves detected by the Arecibo Observatory could herald a turning of the tide for a peculiar class of cosmic signals. Until recently, the signals had only ever been detected by a telescope in Australia, a pattern that fueled doubts about their origin.

Fewer than a dozen of these bursts, lasting for only a few thousandths of a second, have ever been reported. Called “fast radio bursts,” the signals are cosmic enigmas that appear to come from the very, very distant universe. But since the first burst discovery in 2007, scientists have not only wondered what kind of cosmic object could produce such a tremendously bright, short-lived radio pulse – but have disagreed about whether the bursts are even celestial.

Continue Reading

humanoidhistory:

Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie Duke on the Moon, April 21, 1972. Photo by John Young. (NASA)

skeptv:

Born to Engineer - Biomedical bubbles with Eleanor Stride

"If I were to say that the complexity of what we do is the same as the complexity of designing a car, I wouldn’t be exaggerating."

Since 2007 biomedical engineer Eleanor Stride has been designing a revolutionary new method of delivering drugs by injecting tiny microbubbles into the bloodstream.

Traditional drug delivery through pills or injection send the active agent through the bloodstream meaning that a high percentage of cells in the body are exposed to the drug. In contrast, the targetted delivery mechanism with bubbles aims to release the drugs only when they reach the part of the body where they are needed.

Some of the bubbles are magnetic and the research team is using groundbreaking techniques developed by the Davy Faraday Research Laboratory at the Royal Institution to control the movement and activation of the bubbles within the body.

This drug delivery method has the potential to avoid the widespread destruction of healthy cells that is presently unavoidable with chemotherapy, which would revolutionise the future treatment of cancer sufferers.

The film was produced by Duckrabbit for the ERA Foundation as part of a pilot scheme to demonstrate how engineering is changing lives and how the world works. Ultimately, the project aims to attract young people towards engineering education and careers.

via The Royal Institution.

new-aesthetic:

Twitter / contagious: “Hmm, nobody is clicking our banner ads. Let’s try them on print. (via @spencerholladay)”

new-aesthetic:

Twitter / contagious: “Hmm, nobody is clicking our banner ads. Let’s try them on print. (via @spencerholladay)”

(via futurescope)